Though our programs vary in format and mode of instruction, they typically involve several complementary activities: close observation and guided analysis of works of art, hands-on exercises, and group discussions and presentations.


Each of these programs is designed with several goals in mind:


●    Enhance observation skills

●    Analyze and solve problems with a rational and intuitive approach

●    Create a nonjudgmental environment, safe for failure

●    Encourage expression of different perspectives  

●    Foster cooperation and team building 

●    Recover from professional fatigue and stress

●    Transfer acquired skills to professional practice

EXAMPLES OF HANDS-ON PROGRAMS


PORTRAITURE AS A DIALOGUE  


Looking at faces is fundamental to the human experience whether or not you have ever tried to render one. Participants create portraits of one another not with the focus on accurate representation but in order to convey the overall character of their model (2 hours)    


CONTOUR DRAWING  


Participants are encouraged to draw by reducing three-dimensional forms to descriptive lines that unlock the complexity of larger structures. The focus of this workshop is on improving one’s attentiveness and observation skills (2 hours)



PHOTOGRAPHY  


Participants are encouraged to learn new ways of seeing and representing the familiar through this workshop that focuses on creative problem solving and the powers of observation (2 hours)





SCULPTURE  


Participants are encouraged to discover new uses for the commonplace and the ordinary by manipulating ready-made or readily available objects and materials into new structures, as means of enhancing their ability to think differently, or approach the familiar in novel ways (2 hours)

EXAMPLES OF DISCUSSION-BASED PROGRAMS


UNDERSTANDING FACES, BODY LANGUAGE, AND CHARACTERS

Participants analyze and discuss selected portraits or narrative compositions with focus on the representation of character and emotions as a means of enhancing empathy (1 ½ hours)



DETAILS AND THE DIFFERENCE THEY MAKE

Participants analyze and discuss works of art – either by the same artist or on the same subject – in order to improve their observation skills and the awareness of the importance of seemingly insignificant details for the meaning of the image as a whole (1 ½ hours)



RECOGNIZING VISUAL PATTERNS

Participants analyze and discuss selected works of art by one artist in an effort to identify visual patterns that betray authorship, as a means of enhancing diagnostic skill in situations that require both close looking and imaginative leaps from reading specific signs to more general characteristics (1 ½ hours)



DEALING WITH AMBIGUITY

Participants analyze and discuss carefully selected works of art that create interpretive puzzles or open up a variety of possible ways of looking and interpretation in order to gain a greater level of comfort in dealing with ambiguity in their day-to-day work (1 ½ hours)